Blogging Statistics & Trends 2018, Thanks to Andy Crestodina & Orbit Media Studios

This is a blog post about blogging: how original.

But really, it is original… that is, original research by Andy Crestodina of Chicago-based Orbit Media Studios.

As was the case at least a few times before, I was one of those who responded to this year’s survey. The results from my answers, as well as those of 1,095 others, are linked below. It’s an excellent overview — with fascinating trends and clarity on what tends to work most effectively (measured by the subjectively termed “strong results”).

Having created well over 500 posts in a decade-plus, my pace has slowed considerably (as you can tell by clicking on the month-by-month archives on the left side of this page). At the same time, I have been getting better at reviewing, updating and in some cases re-purposing old blog posts. (Hey, there’s no such thing as plagiarizing yourself.)

A few other observations from my experience:

*It’s remarkable how many links get broken over time.

Be sure to clean ’em up on your website, as I strive to do on mine. Spot a broken link or some other problem on this post, or anywhere else on my site? Let me know at matt@insideedgepr.com. In fact, I have blogged about the power of kindly alerting folks to these types of boo-boos.

*A few years ago, I added “Related Posts” at the bottom of each post, to guide visitors interested in digging deeper on a topic.

I have also “back-filled” many of the posts from over the past 11 years or so. It’s a continual process and I chip away at it, little by little in 10 to 30 minute pockets of time. Speaking of time, did you know I have included the word “time” in over 20 blog posts, including this one about disgraced Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte?

OK, enough about me and my precious hyperlinks. To learn about the latest trends in the world of blogging, just click on the image below:

Blogging Statistics and Trends: The 2018 Survey of 1000+ Bloggers

Related Posts:
Blog Discipline Breeds PR Benefits
Blog, Schmog: Why You Absolutely, Positively Don’t Have to Blog

Blog, Schmog: Why You Absolutely, Positively Don’t Have to Blog

You hear “blog,” and think, “Blah!” As in, “Yuck!”

No, make that “Blah-blah-blah!” As in, “A royal waste of my time—as a reader, and certainly as a writer.”

OK, I hear you. And it’s true—you don’t have to write a blog. Isn’t it so 2007, anyway?

Of course, if you are looking to grow with the 21st Century way of doing things, then there’s got to be some online formula to help you promote and grow your cause, business or widget of the moment. Try this combination on for size:

Hone the Discipline of Reflecting

Take some time to actually think about what you’ve done, what you’re doing and what you plan to do. Then distill those thoughts into words. It’s not simple, but on the other side is a huge pay-off: improved processes and practices.

Psst, let others in on your mental journey. It increases their understanding of and respect for what you’re up to.

Display Your Expertise

Through anecdotes and insights that only you possess, convey what separates you from the pack. Give a bit of yourself away—not the whole store, but enough to add value to those who come across your path.

Send a Signal That Your Cause or Business Is Alive and Well

When you haven’t updated that website in years—or, God forbid, haven’t gotten around to creating one in the first place—think of some simple way to let this cat out of the bag:

“Hey, everyone, I’m still around and gainfully engaged in the marketplace.”

Hint: if you’re thinking of cutting-and-pasting those very words into an e-mail, then sending it to everyone you know, it’s time to ponder Plan B.

Create An Anchor for All Your Communication

In the online realm, it’s a good idea to figure out a way to rise above the din that comes with billions of options.

So, amid enticements to check out this video, to read that product review or to study your baseball team’s latest box score, how do you help cyber-surfing Hansels and Gretels find their way to your home?

By consistently leaving trails of crumbs—on your e-mail signature, in comments on websites and everywhere in between—that all lead back to the same URL (Uniform Resource Locator).

That’s a good start: engage in reflective thinking; show and share your expertise; regularly remind the world that your business is in business; and establish a reliable communication anchor.

By now, it should be abundantly obvious that you absolutely, positively don’t have to blog. Then again, you don’t have to harness one of the most multi-dimensional, dynamic ways for kick-starting your efforts.

Myths To Combat Along The PR Journey

On Monday, through the Small Business Networking Event held at the Oak Park (Ill.) Public Library, I will be sharing public-relations tips with business owners, entrepreneurs and those seeking to launch enterprises of various kinds.

Among the points I will convey are four myths that can sidetrack individuals and organizations from attaining genuine PR success.

Here’s one: It’s all about the press release.

Reality: First of all, the proper term is “news release,” since the press is only one of the targets, anyway. In addition, the news release is simply one part—often, but not always, an integral part—of a multi-pronged approach to increasing your target market’s awareness.

Other vital elements to get your message across:

*Creating a professional, dynamic website that clearly communicates what makes your product or service superior to and distinctive from your competitors;

*Understanding what the various media need in a story and then going all-out to fulfill those cravings with timely, localized, visually compelling material.

*Identifying Internet venues where you can connect directly with your audience, such as contributing to a blog, creating a blog of your own, or posting a video on sites like YouTube.

There are numerous other myths and misunderstandings about PR, including:

*If your publicist has strong media connections, then don’t worry about having a great news hook.

*The publicist’s top goal should be media placement—getting as many stories told through the media as possible.

*PR is a contact sport—the key is to flood as many media outlets with your story, then cross your fingers that some will be interested.

For more specifics about the nature of those myths, you can find, on the Resources page of the Inside Edge PR website, PR Success Tips: 4 Myths To Combat Along The Way.